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One Year of DC Potager

March 1, 2018

Happy Anniversary everybody! I started this blog after giving my first gardening talk at Rooting DC 2017. I will be back at Rooting DC 2018 on Saturday to give an hour-long talk about good bugs in the garden and I'm so excited.

 

My primary goal for this past year of garden blogging was to discuss how we can grow food year-round in DC while highlighting the wealth of local resources we have for urban gardening. I've been thinking a lot about what I want to do for the coming year and I've come up with a few goals and purposes.


I want to spend more time showing and telling what's going on in the garden, with lots more photos, and including discussion of how I resolve issues as they arise. Well, I haven't started sowing veggie seeds in my raised beds yet because of the freezing temperatures that are expected for this weekend, but I did pick up some cold-tolerant annuals to cheer up the area along the back fence.

 

Snapdragons are a favorite flower of bumble bees because they are buff and burly enough to push through the petals to access the pollen and nectar. I have a particular nostalgic fondness for snapdragons because I grew up playing with them in my mother's garden, gently squeezing the flower "heads" from the sides to make the "mouths" open and shut.   

 

 

I want to post more about bug-friendly gardening, with photos of good bug sightings.

 

I spotted this mantid egg case 2 weeks ago in a perennial pollinator plant bed at the Capital Area Food Bank garden. We relocated it to a more central location in the garden. I aspire to bring my home garden to a place where mantid sightings occur more often. 

 

 

My good bug gardening research generated lots of ideas for even more that I can do in my small space, so I'm excited to share that journey with all of you. I've been learning more about how climate change affects our gardens and what actions we can take as gardeners and concerned citizens.

 


The above video from the National Park Service describes what the cherry blossoms have to tell us about climate change.

 

 

Several of my posts from this past year were inspired by readers' suggestions. If you have a gardening question and want a nerd--I mean, dedicated researcher--to answer the question for you, I'm on it. Just ask.

 

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